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Can a Donkey Really See All of Its Feet?

A donkey can see all of its feet at once because of the wide spacing of the eyes on its head. This eye positioning gives donkeys high quality peripheral vision so they have a nearly 360 degree view of their surroundings. Donkeys, much like horses, are naturally cautious creatures and their wide vision may make them more likely to catch a glimpse of something that alarms them. In response, donkeys may kick if someone comes up behind them without sufficient preparation, which is why it is not recommended to attempt to touch a donkey’s back feet without proper training.

More about donkeys:

  • The average donkey can live in captivity from 25 to 40 years.
  • Donkey milk, which is higher in protein and sugar but lower in fat than cow’s milk, was once used for medicinal purposes, for treatment of conditions including premature babies and sick children, as well as adults with tuberculosis.
  • The braying sound of a donkey is how it communicates with other donkeys in the wild and is so loud, it can travel nearly 2 miles (3.22 km).
Allison Boelcke
By Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
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Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
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