We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

What is a Goldeye?

Anna T.
By
Updated Jun 04, 2024
Our promise to you
All Things Nature is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At All Things Nature, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject-matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

The goldeye species of fish belongs to the Mooneye family of fishes. They may grow to be as long as 16 inches (40 cm), but most do not exceed 12 inches (30 cm). Goldeye fish usually have iridescent, silver-colored bodies that may appear to have a mixture of other colors when a closer look is taken. Some of these fish have bluish-green and white colors on their bellies in addition to the silver. This fish gets its name from the color of its eyes, which are a bright gold.

Goldeye fish are typically found distributed from the southeastern United States to as far north as Canada. They normally prefer to inhabit freshwater areas such as streams and lakes that are very icy and cold. Goldeyes do not usually fare well in warm water, and they will seek out cold water if temperatures in a given area start to warm up. They are also not likely to be found in rapids or any type of water that is fast moving and tend to stay near slower moving water.

These fish are typically nocturnal in nature and come out at night to do most of their foraging for food. Goldeyes will eat plants, but they generally prefer to eat other living things. Most of their diet consists of various crustaceans, small minnows, and insects. Goldeyes will usually eat most any type of fish or living creature that is smaller than they are. The great number of teeth these fish tend to have on both their jaws and tongues helps them to be more efficient at consuming their prey.

Goldeyes lay around 12,000 eggs every year, and in most cases these eggs take only about two weeks to hatch. The young goldeye fish typically stays close to its mother for two or three months before leaving for good. In its first year of life, a baby goldeye fish will grow to be roughly 7 or 8 inches long (18 to 20 cm) and normally reaches maturity by the age of two.

Historically, most people did not eat goldeye fish because the texture of the meat was considered too soft and unappetizing. It wasn't until the late 1800s that many people began to eat this type of fish instead of feeding the ones they caught to their pets. It became a popular choice for food when people began to serve it smoked. Many people consider it a very tasty type of fish when it is served this way. Goldeye is considered a gourmet dish in Canada by the majority of people who like it.

All Things Nature is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Anna T.
By Anna T.
Anna Thurman is a skilled writer who lends her talents to All Things Nature. Her ability to research and present information in an engaging and accessible manner allows her to create content that resonates with readers across a wide range of subjects.
Discussion Comments
Anna T.
Anna T.
Anna Thurman is a skilled writer who lends her talents to All Things Nature. Her ability to research and present information in an engaging and accessible manner allows her to create content that resonates with readers across a wide range of subjects.
All Things Nature, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

All Things Nature, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.