We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

What are the Different Types of Flat Lizard?

Sara Schmidt
By
Updated Jun 04, 2024
Our promise to you
All Things Nature is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At All Things Nature, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject-matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

Bold, bright coloration makes the common flat lizard, a small reptile with nine subspecies, a well-liked animal. The lizard is a rainbow of color, with different hues making up each of its body sections. Scientifically known as the Platysaurus intermedius, the animal lives in southern Africa, and is a member of the Cordylidae family.

Flat lizards are so vividly colored that they almost look like something from a fairy tale. Each subspecies is represented with its own unique array of colors. A male flat lizard might have a blue or green head with a yellow midsection, orange and yellow tail, yellow arms, and a blue underbelly. Female lizards, as well as juveniles of the species, are not as brightly colored. They typically have black scales, brown bellies, and white stripes on their backs.

The lizards live in colonies, some of which can be very large. They prefer weathering, or exfoliating, rocks made from quartzite, granite, or sandstone. Most of these lizards can be found in moist savannahs throughout Swaziland, Zimbabwe, Mpumalanga, Botswana, Malawi, KwaZulu-Natal, and Mozambique.

Each flat lizard's size depends upon its subspecies. The largest flat lizard can grow up to five inches (12 centimeters) in length, while smaller subspecies may only grow up to three inches (seven centimeters). New hatchlings, which hatch in late December to early January, measure up to one and one-half inches (nearly four centimeters) in length.

Hatchlings are laid in communal egg sites. Each flat lizard colony shares one of these sites, which typically exist in a warm rock crevice. A pair of eggs, which are oval-shaped, are usually laid per female flat lizard.

If kept in captivity, flat lizards can live for up to three years. Considered exotic pets, flat rock lizards are the most widely distributed of all Platyasaurus animals. They are moderately priced, and like other lizards as pets such as the gecko, anole, and skink, they require a lizard cage, heating bulb, fresh water, and appropriate food. This food can usually be satisfied through a combination of nutritious store bought lizard food and fresh live insects.

Of the subspecies of flat lizard, rhodesianus is the largest. Some males of this species feature red heads. The nigrescens subspecies has yellow scales, an orange tale, and a black head, while the subniger lizard is largely dark green and features white spots. Other subspecies include the wilhelmi, parvus, iopinus, intermedius, nyasae, and natalensis.

All Things Nature is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Sara Schmidt
By Sara Schmidt
With a Master's Degree in English from Southeast Missouri State University, Sara Schmidt puts her expertise to use by writing for All Things Nature, plus various magazines, websites, and nonprofit organizations. She published her own novella and has other literary projects in the works. Sara's diverse background includes teaching children in Spain, tutoring college students, running CPR and first aid classes, and organizing student retreats, reflecting her passion for education and community engagement.
Discussion Comments
Sara Schmidt
Sara Schmidt
With a Master's Degree in English from Southeast Missouri State University, Sara Schmidt puts her expertise to use by writing for All Things Nature, plus various magazines, websites, and nonprofit organizations. She published her own novella and has other literary projects in the works. Sara's diverse background includes teaching children in Spain, tutoring college students, running CPR and first aid classes, and organizing student retreats, reflecting her passion for education and community engagement.
All Things Nature, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

All Things Nature, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.