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How Fast Do Raindrops Fall?

In situations that do not involve rain that is being blown by wind, raindrops can fall at a speed as fast as 18 miles per hour (29 km/h). The reason why raindrops will not fall any faster is that any speed over this amount will create air friction that causes the drops to break into smaller drops. The actual speed of a raindrop is determined by its size and the amount of wind involved.

More facts about raindrops:

  • Although many people believe that raindrops are shaped like human tears, that is not the case. Typically, raindrops are round and somewhat flat, assuming a shape that is similar to that of a hamburger bun.

  • Rain and raindrops are sometimes mentioned in popular songs. One well-known example is Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head, which was written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David. Recorded by B.J. Thomas and released in late 1969, the song reached No. 1 on the US Billboard Hot 100 charts and held that position for four weeks in January 1970.

  • Raindrops are formed by the condensation of water vapor in clouds. When the drops become heavy enough, they fall from the clouds.

Malcolm Tatum
By Malcolm Tatum
Malcolm Tatum, a former teleconferencing industry professional, followed his passion for trivia, research, and writing to become a full-time freelance writer. He has contributed articles to a variety of print and online publications, including All Things Nature, and his work has also been featured in poetry collections, devotional anthologies, and newspapers. When not writing, Malcolm enjoys collecting vinyl records, following minor league baseball, and cycling.

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Malcolm Tatum
Malcolm Tatum
Malcolm Tatum, a former teleconferencing industry professional, followed his passion for trivia, research, and writing...
Learn more
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